www.MarcusBall.com

Marcus Ball Contact Site Index
 
What is Learning? ] Theories of Learning ] References ]
Learning how to Learn ...

 Contents
References


Up
SOLO

Systems & Conversation
Authority & learning
Bloom’s Taxonomy
Imitation
Learning & Teaching System
The Learning Curve
Learning how to Learn
Situational Learning
Resistance to Learning
Tacit knowledge

Past Employment

Residential Property Management Community Manager PPA
Residential Property Management Assistant Manager, Leasing  HVA
Online Technical Account Manager
Massage Therapy Clinical Therapist
Telecom Products Sales Executive
ASP Support Client Services
Inquiry Center CRM Specialist
Call Center Design Engineer
Help Desk Desktop Support
Call Center Client Communications
Hospitality Reservations Manager
Sales Special Orders
Retail Commercial Ast Manager

Or Read:
Resume
Customer Centricity
Ethics

Learning how to Learn

For our purposes, there are two main traditions about learning how to learn. One stems from the Deep and Surface learning strategies studies, and the other from the work of Gregory Bateson.
Bateson maintained that many discussions about learning were confused by category errors about the kind of learning they were about. He suggested that there are a number of levels, in which each superior level is the class of its subordinates (rather like Kelly's notion of superordinate and subordinate constructs).

 bateson

Bateson himself uses the analogy of movement: 

  • Learning 0 is direct experience: I put my hand in the fire – it gets burned

Learning 0 is like the position of an object

  • Learning I is what we routinely refer to as learning: the generalisation from basic experiences. I have experienced "hand in fire" and "being burned", and I won't do it again. This is straightforward and compatible even with behavioural views, as well as the cycle of experiential learning.

Learning I is its speed when it moves

  • Learning II (which he sometimes called "Deutero-Learning") contextualises Learning I experiences. It is about developing strategies for maximising Learning I through the extraction of implicit rules, and also putting specific bits of Learning I in context: I don't generally risk getting burned, but I might do so to save someone else from a fire.

Learning II is acceleration (or deceleration) — a change in speed

  • Learning III contextualises Learning II, and is not understood, but it may be the existential (or spiritual) level: What does it say about me that I would risk getting burned in order to ...?

Learning III is a change in the rate of acceleration — a change in the change of the change of position...

    The higher the level, the less we understand about the process, and although such higher level learning undoubtedly takes place, the more difficult it is deliberately to manage it.

    Note that levels of learning are different from levels of understanding, as exemplified in Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives, and also to be distinguished from the similar terminology of Gagné.  

This account does not do justice to Bateson's very complex thinking, which starts from posing the question why people get better with practice at doing fairly meaningless tasks such as remembering nonsense syllables.

The interesting question for academic practice is the qualitative shift required to move from Learning 1 to Learning II, which some people find more difficult than others, perhaps in specific subject areas. How do we help them to achieve it? This may be the biggest remaining problem in in pedagogic/andragogic practice.

Some clues are contained in

Marcus Ball ] Contact ] Site Index ]