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Dr,John Stephens

 

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Studies in Psychology

I have included a variety of information in this section.  You will find some of my own writings as well as other topics that go beyond my scope of experience.  I would like to dedicate this section to Dr John Stephens who I had the benefit of knowing and learning from for many years.

Psychology of Drugs and Addiction

Section 1 - US Approach to Drug Management from Drugs and Society, Ninth Edition (Drugs and Society - Are drug laws realistic?)

Section 2 - Notes and Study Information from Drugs and Society, Ninth Edition (My Docs are Word 97-2003 files):

ESSAYS:

Notes and Study Information from Drugs and Society, Ninth Edition (My Docs are Word 97-2003 files):

ESSAYS:

Study Guide and Quiz information comes from Drugs and Society, Ninth Edition by Glen R. Hanson, Peter J. Venturelli, and Annette E. Fleckenstein

Drug Reference Library



Drug Notes (These were sent to me by someone on the web who took a similar class by a Dr.  M. Plonsky, Ph.DI found them useful):

In 2004, 19.1 million Americans, or 7.9 percent of the population aged 12 or older, were current illicit drug users (1). Despite 70 billion dollars and more than one million arrests, the "war on drugs" has only dented addiction and violent crime in the nation. Governments have invested the largest proportion of their financial and personnel resources in trying to limit the availability of illegal drugs. Critics of our nations' drug policy contend that the war is being fought on the wrong front.

Paradoxically, few policy makers promote the reduction of alcohol, tobacco or pharmaceutical drugs through the imposition of similar controls. It has been reported that the annual advertising budget for just one brand name of "light beer" was 25 times greater than a recent annual prevention and education budget for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (2).

In addition, drug education is often targeted at youth in contrast to adults in spite of evidence suggesting that the use of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs may increase dramatically throughout the lifecycle.

You should know that 12.8 million Americans, or approximately 6 percent of the household population aged twelve and older, use illegal drugs on a current basis (within the past thirty days) (1). When teaching drug education to your family, children often ask about their parents personal experience with recreational drug use. These questions may include, "Did you ever smoke marijuana?" "Do you drink alcohol?" "Have you ever tried LSD?" Novice parents are more likely to admit prior or even current drug use (especially legal ones such as alcohol) to their kids than veteran parents are. Self-disclosure regarding personal drug use is not advised. It is better to reply to these questions with a response such as "To the best of my knowledge, when I was younger, the following recreational drugs were/weren't available."

Statistics of drug use widespread use and amount of money spent each year for legal and illegal substances.

o    Americans spend $104 billion for alcohol and $51.9 billion for tobacco products (95 percent on cigarettes).

o    Prescription drugs accounted for $176 billion while over-the-counter (patent) drug sales amounted to $23.5 billion.

o    In 2000, Americans spent about $36 billion on cocaine, $10 billion on heroin, $5.4 billion on methamphetamine, $11 billion on marijuana, and $2.4 billion on other substances.

o    Sixty percent of the world's illegal drug market is in the U.S.A. (with 6% of the world's population).

Source: Hanson, G.R., Venturelli, P.J., & Fleckenstein, A.E. (2006). Drugs & Society (9th ed.). Boston: Jones and Bartlett Pub. (3)


 

Commonly Abused Drugs by Use
Americans over age 12 who report using drugs for non-medical reasons within the past 12 months.
(Source:Department of Health and Human Services. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, (2004). Results from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings (Revised: 9/8/2005). Washington, DC).

Users

 

Substance (Type)

121,000,000

 

Alcohol (Depressant)

59,000,000

 

Cigarettes (Stimulant)

14,600,000

 

Marijuana and Hashish (Cannabis)

7,200,000

 

Smokeless Tobacco (Stimulants, such as chewing tobacco and snuff)

4,400,000

 

Analgesics (Narcotics, such as Darvon, Demerol, Percodan, Tylenol w/Codeine)

1,530,000

 

Cocaine (Stimulant)

1,200,000

 

Stimulants (Stimulants, such as amphetamines, diet pills, Preludin)

929,000

 

Hallucinogens (Hallucinogens such as Phencyclidine (PCP), Mescaline (Peyote), LSD, Psilocybin (mushrooms), Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA))

857,000

 

Inhalants (Organic Solvents, such as lighter fluids, spray paints, airplane glue, cleaning solvents, Amyl Nitrite)

467,000

 

Crack Cocaine (Stimulant)

450,000

 

Ecstasy (Stimulant/Hallucinogen) MDMA (3-4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine)

333,333

 

Sedatives (Depressants, such as barbiturates, sleeping pills, Seconal)

166,000

 

Heroin (Narcotic)

References:

1.     Department of Health and Human Services. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, (2004). Results from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings (Revised: 9/8/2005). Washington, DC. Retrieved November 19, 2008 from http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/NSDUH/2k4NSDUH/2k4results/2k4results.htm

2.     Adams Beer Handbook. Adams Business Media, New York; 1998.

3.     Hanson, G.R., Venturelli, P.J., & Fleckenstein, A.E. Drugs & Society (9th ed.). Jones and Bartlett Pub. Boston; 2006.

Drug Reference Library • Signs of Use • Adolescent Abuse • Workplace Abuse • Pregnancy & Drugs • Talking to Kids • Binge Drinking •

 

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